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    Simple question.




    What conclusion can i draw from this: I have the number of new cases of Parkinson's disease in a hospital and I have the distribution of cases with respect to age, gender, ethnicity, geographical distribution and diabetic status (for e.g., 31% of them have diabetes)?

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    Re: Simple question.

    I am not sure what statistical test you can run since you only have those who did have it, not those that did not. You can do descriptive statistics linking cases with parkison to demographics (so that you knew what percent of cases were males versus females).
    "Very few theories have been abandoned because they were found to be invalid on the basis of empirical evidence...." Spanos, 1995

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    Re: Simple question.

    noetsi thanks for your answer. So I can only do % of cases who are male/female or smoker/non-smoker, and I cannot find a risk factor because there are no control groups?

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    Re: Simple question.

    What would your risk factor tell you here? If you don't have data on people without the disease then how do you know if the demographics are different at all for those with the disease compared to those without the disease?
    I don't have emotions and sometimes that makes me very sad.

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    Re: Simple question.


    It is not an issue of not having a control group. You have no intervention so a control group is really beside the point. I sort of disagree with Dason here in practice, however. If you find for example that 75 percent of the people who get a disease is male than it suggests that being male may be associated with getting the disease. The total population consist of those that did and did not get the disease. We know the total proportion of males in the population so if the percent who get a disease is far higher than that it suggests getting the disease is not at random.

    There are numerous flaws in that of course including the lack of ability to decide which of many factors that might cause the disease this way actually does. For that you need at least a statistical control and much better a design to address confounds. Also the number who get the disease in the population obviously varies from those who come to hospitals. This is only a starting point - you would have to pursue what you find with real tests.

    I suspect Dason will tell me I am totally wrong very soon
    "Very few theories have been abandoned because they were found to be invalid on the basis of empirical evidence...." Spanos, 1995

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