+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: single function of two gaussian distributed variables..

  1. #1
    Points: 6, Level: 1
    Level completed: 11%, Points required for next Level: 44

    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    single function of two gaussian distributed variables..




    Hi Folks,

    I have a two 2 dimenstional gaussian function of variables x and y and of their respective standard deviations. I have single valued function d(x, y) and I want to know the probability density function of this d(x,y)

    Trying to understand how I would proceed to calculate this ?

    Cheers,
    Farzad

  2. #2
    Devorador de queso
    Points: 95,705, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Awards:
    Posting AwardCommunity AwardDiscussion EnderFrequent Poster
    Dason's Avatar
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    12,931
    Thanks
    307
    Thanked 2,629 Times in 2,245 Posts

    Re: single function of two gaussian distributed variables..

    What is the function of interest.
    I don't have emotions and sometimes that makes me very sad.

  3. #3
    Points: 6, Level: 1
    Level completed: 11%, Points required for next Level: 44

    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Re: single function of two gaussian distributed variables..

    Quote Originally Posted by Dason View Post
    What is the function of interest.
    A very complicated but differentiable function ! I think there should be a general rule.

    thanks

  4. #4
    Points: 7,821, Level: 59
    Level completed: 36%, Points required for next Level: 129

    Posts
    159
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts

    Re: single function of two gaussian distributed variables..


    If you mean with
    Quote Originally Posted by Farzad View Post
    single valued function d(x, y)
    the marginal probability distribution

    and with
    Quote Originally Posted by Farzad View Post
    I want to know the probability density function of this d(x,y)
    the joint probility distribution

    you have to fit the bivariate normal distribution onto your data.
    Prediction is very difficult, especially about the future. (Niels Bohr)

+ Reply to Thread

           




Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts






Advertise on Talk Stats