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Thread: Clinical research, Adequate statistical approach?

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    Clinical research, Adequate statistical approach?




    Dear all!

    Having completed basic science projects, entering clinical research demands a whole set of other statistical approaches. Please help :-)

    The clinical questions are:

    Which variables are chief responsible for the complication rate after a surgical treatment?
    1) overall complication rate (any of the 11 types of complications): yes/no
    2) the specific 11 types of complication (yes/no)

    Clinical suspects:
    - age [years]
    - gender (2 subtypes: M,F)
    - type of medical condition (9 subtypes: 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9)
    - delay of operation [days]
    - surgeon's experience [4 subtypes: 1,2,3,4]

    No missing data at all.

    Available statistical software: STATA, Graph Pad Prism 6.

    Looking forward to hearing from you! Thanx in advance!
    Attached Files

  2. #2
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    Re: Clinical research, Adequate statistical approach?

    So you want to find predictor of 1 & 2. For 2, do you want to examine each individually as well?

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    Re: Clinical research, Adequate statistical approach?

    I am sorry for joking with you, DrDan (in a serious area) but it seems like you know much more about your colleagues experience than about your patients gender and age. Because in the file I saw there was a lot of missing values there. Then I saw:

    No missing data at all.
    So maybe there is something wrong with the file you sent, or I could not read it in properly. Since I know that many here are reluctant to open an excel-file (this was an exception for me) I just show a copy of the first 15 rows (out of DrDan's about 750 rows).

    Spoiler:


    I guess that when there is a "1" in say C3 then there has been a complication there. And all the zeros are not included. So it is a quite sparse matrix.

    I could not see any data for
    - type of medical condition (9 subtypes: 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9)


    This is an interesting question. How should this be modelled?

    What is hlsmith talking about? Is my data crazy?

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    Re: Clinical research, Adequate statistical approach?

    hlsmith did not open the mystery file. So your sanity may be unblemsihed.

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    Re: Clinical research, Adequate statistical approach?

    Quote Originally Posted by hlsmith View Post
    hlsmith did not open the mystery file. So your sanity may be unblemsihed.
    I did not hypothesize that I was crazy, only that my data were.

    But I didn't understand were you got the 1 & 2 from.

    So you want to find predictor of 1 & 2.

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    Re: Clinical research, Adequate statistical approach?


    Just used the assumed data behind the person's "1)" and "2)".

    I would question the type I and type II error rates around lunacy hypothesis based on self-study.

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