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Thread: proc SQL

  1. #31
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    Re: proc SQL




    I bet most people asking for data don't know what to do with it!
    Stop cowardice, ban guns!

  2. #32
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    Re: proc SQL

    Quote Originally Posted by hlsmith View Post
    I bet most people asking for data don't know what to do with it!
    Typically, no. When I'm not lazy and actually interested in taking on more work, I'd make sure to wear my BA hat and keep asking why, why, why? Until I get to the root of what they're trying to do. Usually clients have a vague, flowery notion of what they want. A data scientist's job is to unpack that into all the components of what it is they're really trying to do (much in the same way people asking Qs here don't really ask the right Qs half the time). That process of decomposing the problem lays out the work to be done in a clear operational way that you can then tackle it in a clear and objective way. Otherwise, it's "I need X" and then they come back next week "I need Y" because X wasn't what they really wanted and you end up providing little value as a data professional and end up wasting a lot of time.
    You should definitely use jQuery. It's really great and does all things.

  3. #33
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    Re: proc SQL

    Well, in my experience anyway, they know why they want it. They may not understand what you produce or ask for the wrong data, but they know what the want. Its your role to get what they want not what they ask for if you can. And, this is the most difficult part, explain the limitations of the data and methods. Talking about uncertainty in either wins you few friends.

    Of course, the fact that I have doubts about my understanding of statistics makes this harder for me. I got a Master's in Measurement and Statistics and spend lots of hours reading it (its why I came here in the first place) to address this and still am not too sure about that
    "Very few theories have been abandoned because they were found to be invalid on the basis of empirical evidence...." Spanos, 1995

  4. #34
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    Re: proc SQL


    If you think business people know what they want, then I can't imagine you've worked with them enough. They may *think* they know, but as soon as your scratch the surface and dig deeper you'll find a chasm of understanding. They rarely do the due diligence to really get detailed requirements around what they want. That's what a good business analyst does (and I'm scarcely even that good at it). Business users don't know the technical details, which is where BAs or business tech analysts specifically translate business requirements into those specific technical requirements, so the tech user can most easily get them what they want. But to think they just know what they want .. no ... not they don't. The one benefit of my old position was the ability to work directly with business stakeholders and play that BA role for analytic projects. Those typically don't have that BA intermediary to flesh out the details. It was up to me to do that in a rather agile way (wearing a PM hat to some degree)
    You should definitely use jQuery. It's really great and does all things.

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