$60 - tutor wanted

duval

New Member
#1
$60 an hour.

R code
Logistic and Poisson Regression
Central Limit Theorem
ANOVA
Single, two pop tests
Simple and Multiple Linear Regression
Time Series Analysis
ARIMA Models
Hierarchical Bayesian Methods

contact: jasonduval78@gmail.com
 
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Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#2
Do you know about the theory behind these topics and are just looking for how to do them in R?
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#9
R is fun... but that doesn't really explain why you need to learn all of this before the end of Sunday.
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#13
If all you had to do was learn the language and none of the theory then it's at least feasible. But trying to learn the theory and how to do it in R would be... pretty intense.
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
#14
It would take at least 3 days to learn how to do half that stuff in R, to use R, and have a basic grasp of that (i.e., reproduce it on your own). That's not including the fact you'd also need to learn the theory to interpret the results of your R work. R is pretty easy to pick up. It's understanding what you're doing that is hard. You're basically asking to learn at least 6 different classes worth of stuff in a weekend. Math doesn't come with Cliffs Notes, unfortunately. It takes a lot of work. That work, takes time!
 

noetsi

Fortran must die
#15
It would take at least 3 days to learn how to do half that stuff in R, to use R, and have a basic grasp of that (i.e., reproduce it on your own). That's not including the fact you'd also need to learn the theory to interpret the results of your R work. R is pretty easy to pick up. It's understanding what you're doing that is hard. You're basically asking to learn at least 6 different classes worth of stuff in a weekend. Math doesn't come with Cliffs Notes, unfortunately. It takes a lot of work. That work, takes time!
I am happy to hear that since I have about 6 months to learn it. Which is how long I planned to take at a minimum.
 

ledzep

Point Mass at Zero
#16
Thought I'll also jump into the bandwagon and throw my two cents.

If people can learn that much theory (nevermind the R codes) in one weekend, why go university and spend 3 years time learning all those modules?

Learning things overnight just like that is not possible. It is like expecting to run before you learn to walk.

You're looking for a crash crash crash crashcourse here! Anyway, good luck and happy learning!
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
#17
I am happy to hear that since I have about 6 months to learn it. Which is how long I planned to take at a minimum.
You mean R? I learned it effectively within a few days of starting my job. I had a computer science background, though, so the structural programming was intuitive. It just takes getting used to the syntax. It probably took me some 6 months to finally get out of my comfort zone and learn how to use the vast faculties that R has, such as the apply family of functions (instead of loops). Of course, reading books like Data Manipulating Using R and such (and online documents or The R Book) really helped me start to understand the methodology to R programming. As all R programmers should know, it comes down to vectorization. That is not a concept people pick up in other languages, really. It is what I think makes R one of the best tools for dealing with data, because data can often be thought of and managed as a vector of some sort (SAS has IMS and Matlab deals with matrices as a basic element, so those are somewhat closer to the concept; they still don't implement things as robustly as I think R does).

With the right tools (i.e., books) and this forum, you should have no problem picking up R.
 

noetsi

Fortran must die
#18
Given that I still use Enterprise Guide rather than SAS when I can I suspect you're a lot faster than I at picking up code :) Thanks for the comments on R
 

trinker

ggplot2orBust
#19
Since the offer is rescinded I figure it's ok to hijack this thread :) Noetsi we both know I'm a bit of a dope and I picked up R. There's different levels of understanding in R. To get the initial learning takes a couple of weeks to get down with a good guide (let me suggest Quick R and/or 'R in Action' a book by the same author.

After you get this stuff down you'll realize wow this does awesome stuff and you may move to other packages (I've went through ddply and reshape2 pretty thoroughly now and am working on tm and ggplot 2 currently).

When I think I think I've learned most of what it can do I see what bryangoodrich or dason or theEcologist can do and I realize there's even more it can do (so many packages so little time).

I see your intellect with stats so I really think R will be not too bad for you to undertake.

PS good luck with the SEM final