Come Take a Walk With Me

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
Best run since my recovery! My right (non-injured) ankle was a little hurting when I began, and my knee has been a bit stiff and popping lately. Think I need to stretch more. Will do that after cardio kickboxing if I can wake up and do the 9 AM class. Still, I didn't feel like I was going to die. No HR monitor this time (forgot!), but I kept going and mentally stayed strong. Felt good!

333 + 1.25 = 334.25 miles

PT: 28 miles
 
Thanks halfnormal! You too How long of runs and what frequncy are you doing? I greatly appreciate the long slow, low hr runs...somethin I never did 3 years ago. I think you left off the .25 on the total or forgot to put mileage on your run. I changed the total below let me know if it's wrong.

Bryangoodrich I agree with what halfnormal said


392.25 + 6 = 398.25
Pt: 101 + 6 = 107
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
I'm not running THAT hard, people! Though, I'm still working on my form. I'll start adding longer slow runs to help my body adapt to the longer duration next month. It'll help if some good shows would come on and I could go watch them while running lol Seriously, I used to do that during prime time shows. Easy way to get 2 hours of walking and running in!

I am getting in better shape, though. I did an HIIT routine that was pretty solid. It was 30/10 splits 2x through with 6 exercises (8 min total): burpees, dive bombers, sit ups, mountain climbers, back lunges, ab rotation w/weighted ball. Maybe it was the shorter split time (50/10 is way too much, at least for now, 50/20 was not help, and 40/20 was too easy), but I felt good. I also didn't do any weights beforehand. I just did my cardio and went to the cardio room. Also, the gym was HOT. Disgustingly hot. The cardio room is usually warm, but it was the only room with freakin' AC running. It felt great. I still sweated all over the floor. Almost slipped during my HIIT lol

I'll probably hit the weights tonight, but I'm definitely going to incorporate HIIT more often, and I still need to get my sleep schedule worked out so I can start doing cycling or kickboxing classes.

398.75 miles = 398.25 + 0.5 (what do you guys think about this form? It could make it easier to notice the total)

PT: 28.5 miles
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
Yeah, I don't have a tablet or anything to watch them on, or I'd already try to get videos I could watch digitally :p

You're right, I could aim for a lower target HR, but currently I'm still trying to push my endurance and running ability. The rest of this month should see me through getting comfortable running again. Hopefully then I can get rid of the sub-mile runs! In doing that, I'll try to do longer lower intensity runs. If I find the time, I may even try doing that outside, whether I'm on the track or using my GPS (which isn't too terribly accurate with my crappy old phone).


WELCOME BACK DASON! :p

Okay, I'm off to the gym soon. I slept all afternoon after stuffing my face with greasy mexican food after finding out I didn't get another job offer. I'm a bit sluggish atm!
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
If I assume a resting heart rate (RHR) of 55--which I think is kind of high, but I'm not in the best of shape or health at the moment--then my 85% THR would be

((220 - AGE) - RHR) * 0.85 + RHR
(190 - 55) * 0.85 + 55
135 * 0.85 + 55
115 + 55 = 170

For a lower bound of 65% we get

135 * 0.65 + 55 = 142

Frankly, I don't know if I run and keep it under 150 lol When I'm warming up on the elliptical (5 min), I seem to level off at a fast pace around 145-155. When I get on the treadmill (10 min) my heart rate gets up around 150 to start and creeps up to 160 as I level off. As I fatigue it slips higher. I figured out how to work my watch again and set an upper bound of 165, and that didn't start alerting me until I was after 5 minutes into my run. So I'm not pushing myself too hard, if my RHR assumption is apt (enough). I didn't even bother to know how hard I worked on the bike, though (5 min). I just went up a level every 30 seconds. Level 16 felt 10x harder than 15 at 3:30 into my bike. I was raining sweat and struggling to breathe, so it was a **** good finish.

Not the smartest move, though, considering I did (deep) squats today. I did back squats (3x10x135lbs) super set with DB laterals (3x8x40lbs) with plate side bends (3x10x35lbs). I called it a day after that. I'm still sleepy, exhausted, feeling like crap, and did some good cardio. My additions are below.

401.75 miles = 400.75 + 1

PT: 29.5 miles


Note, the motivation for that heart rate calculation, as we discussed before, is that you cannot control (1) your max heart rate and (2) your resting heart rate. Thus, we can think of your working heart rate as what you're basing your intensity off of. It wouldn't make any sense to base it off of your MHR or RHR. Thus, we exclude them from the calculation by MHR = 220 - AGE. Then WHR = MHR - RHR. Then take your intensity IxWHR. But put back in the amount of work done by your RHR. Thus, THR = IxWHR + RHR. Make sense? Right. Had I only used THR = IxMHR I would have had a very inaccurate (wide) intensity interval of (124, 162). Not only is it absolutely lower, that lower bound makes me feel ancient and the upper bound makes me seem out of shape! My (140, 170) is both tighter and higher, the way I like it!
 
401.75 + 3.25 = 405
pt: 110.25
Bryabgoodrich from my reading the purpose of hr training was to enable one to run longer distances at a lower hr enabling one to burn fat by staying in the aerobic hr zone. Is this off?
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
Knowing your heart rate simply lets you know how hard you're working. One can just as well use their HR monitoring to tell them if they're working hard enough for interval training. Typically, being aerobic occurs around 60-70% intensity, but what measure and individual fitness can clearly influence that. So, one should figure out when they are exercising aerobically and compare that to their heart rate to get a more accurate gauge of intensity-to-energy-pathway. For example, a fit person may be able to stay relatively aerobic while at 75% or maybe even higher. It just depends on how well their body can get the oxygen to the muscles which is determined by a number of things like VO2 max and the adaptation of their circulatory system (e.g., changes in capillary size). On the other hand, I may not want to be aerobic. I want to train my lactate threshold (LT = that boundary of when you're no longer aerobic and when your body reaches fatigue due to too much blood lactate as a response). Then I'm going to want to workout anerobically, at a higher heart rate intensity (adjusted to my individual body awareness). A trained individual here, too, will probably perform at an even higher intensity than the typical 85%. Those are just good guesses for a starting point. A trained sprinter, for instance, can no doubt push themselves into the 90+ percent intensity range and keep functioning because their ability to remove blood lactate is efficient (the point of LT training). Compare that to my deconditioned self trying to do those first high intensity interval training (HIIT) routines that I couldn't finish. That was me being unable to process the blood lactate and my muscles would fail, or I just was too mentally weak to push through it (technically you can keep going, just with much pain from fatigue, lack of oxygen, etc., until you actually hit the point when your muscles stop functioning). So no, monitoring HR is not about running long distances only. It is about keeping a measure on what energy system you're using and giving yourself a way to objectively identify where you're at on that continuum. It's not static, and it's not exact. But it is an easy measure.
 
Knowing your heart rate simply lets you know how hard you're working. One can just as well use their HR monitoring to tell them if they're working hard enough for interval training. Typically, being aerobic occurs around 60-70% intensity, but what measure and individual fitness can clearly influence that. So, one should figure out when they are exercising aerobically and compare that to their heart rate to get a more accurate gauge of intensity-to-energy-pathway. For example, a fit person may be able to stay relatively aerobic while at 75% or maybe even higher. It just depends on how well their body can get the oxygen to the muscles which is determined by a number of things like VO2 max and the adaptation of their circulatory system (e.g., changes in capillary size). On the other hand, I may not want to be aerobic. I want to train my lactate threshold (LT = that boundary of when you're no longer aerobic and when your body reaches fatigue due to too much blood lactate as a response). Then I'm going to want to workout anerobically, at a higher heart rate intensity (adjusted to my individual body awareness). A trained individual here, too, will probably perform at an even higher intensity than the typical 85%. Those are just good guesses for a starting point. A trained sprinter, for instance, can no doubt push themselves into the 90+ percent intensity range and keep functioning because their ability to remove blood lactate is efficient (the point of LT training). Compare that to my deconditioned self trying to do those first high intensity interval training (HIIT) routines that I couldn't finish. That was me being unable to process the blood lactate and my muscles would fail, or I just was too mentally weak to push through it (technically you can keep going, just with much pain from fatigue, lack of oxygen, etc., until you actually hit the point when your muscles stop functioning). So no, monitoring HR is not about running long distances only. It is about keeping a measure on what energy system you're using and giving yourself a way to objectively identify where you're at on that continuum. It's not static, and it's not exact. But it is an easy measure.
Thanks...all interesting. I understand that I guess since it was a running thread I was assuming the goal was longer distance running. Also, from what I very briefly and naively read some articles on HR training (which were biased towards aerobic training) they sort of beat the point that one needed to be in shape aerobically in order to perform better anaerobically. Has anyone read much on Mark Allen? He wrote a little piece on this here (granted its biased towards distance exercise): http://www.markallenonline.com/maoArticles.aspx?AID=2

It was interesting it took him a year but was able to run at an aerobic HR after one year of training. I saw a brief clip on some Kenyan running and they were monitoring their HR's as they ran 6 minute miles or something, up a hill and their HR didn't hit 100 until mile two...just interesting to me.
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
This is 2 days worth of running (0.5 + 1.5 today). I didn't work hard outside of my cardio, but I ran hard today and biked hard yesterday. I'm going to try and do a HIIT routine tomorrow with light cardio and maybe some good lifting (deadlifts or something power oriented).

414 miles = 412 + 2 miles

PT: 31.5 miles
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
Didn't do any running (to record) yesterday, but to be accountable I thought I'd detail my HIIT routine. It was awesome, but now my left ankle and lower back are killing me. My entire routine was 40 seconds on, 15 seconds rest (40/15 splits). I did 12 rounds. I could have done 15 with a few more exercises (step up + turn over a 4-riser step; biceps curl; another ab routine), but I was good at 12 when my timer stopped lol I didn't do any repeats, so here's the 12 exercises I recall:

1. Burpees with modification (hop-spread legs out then back in after push up)
2. Chest fly (37.5 lbs DBs)
3. Good morning (standing back extensions; 70 lbs BB)
4. Sit ups
5. Dive bombers
6. Step ups (4-riser step that was used as bench for 2.)
7. Squats (BB)
8. Side crunches
9. Mountain climbers
10. Push ups on stability ball (feet on step)
11. One-armed DB snatch
12. Scissor kicks

I basically made myself a little round robin station with my mat on the right for core stuff, room for floor exercises (1., 5., 9.) to the left of it, the step next to that, and then my DB and BB below those. Before I did any of that, I did 5 sets of 10 jumping jacks and a light jog around the room to warm up. I also did that a few times to cool down, along with a little bit of stretching (I should have done more! lol). When I finished, I was dripping sweat and ready to die! It was great, and the eye candy that came in toward the end to stretch wasn't bad, either! lol This was a big change from a month ago when I couldn't even do one set of 3 exercises on a 50/10 routine.

I'll definitely do this again!

Things I'd change: Maybe do more arm routines at the end (arm extensions and curls), use 2 separate stability balls, one for each arm. Even if I end up only planking, it'll be better than the one large one I had available. I'd also try to keep better form. Especially toward the end, I think it was the snatches that ruined my back. I was pushing myself through that one way too hard. I'd also like to have used kettlebells, but I think I'd have to have my own. Mixing weight training movements into these floor routines and core exercises really does a lot. I should probably try to get a little better mix, like half-way through, just do something a bit easier, maybe balance drills of some sort. It'll still keep me active while giving me a bit more rest. Best to position more difficult exercises (snatch!) after these lighter ones.
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
Oh snap. Longest run yet (since recovery). I started off at 5 mph and increased 0.1 mph each minute. The first ten minutes (6.0 mph) went fine. I was around 145-155 bpm heart rate. Then coming up on 15 minutes my heart rate was climbing and fatigue was kicking in. I struggled to keep form, and I turned off my metronome (stopped caring about cadence!). I was at 1.75 miles at 17:30. I walked until 20:00 and then ran that last quarter mile (1 lap on a track) at 7.5 mph (8 min/mile pace) solid. I did a little core afterwards and said screw it: stretched in the sauna. I'm beat, and looking forward to a long day tomorrow that may end with a cycling class, if I have the energy. We'll see. Going to the gym, regardless.

417 + 2 = 419 miles

PT: 33.5 miles
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
That 2 mile run was good. My thighs are killing me! I need to give more attention to my hip flexors, though. Especially stretching them. Today was good. Did a quick warmup, a HIIT routine (40/15 splits; 12 rounds), and then did a little swimming. I'm exhausted! Today's HIIT routine? I had the floor, the mat, a step with 4 risers, and a 40 lbs barbell. Oh, and two medium sized balance balls

1. Burpees (always a good way to start!)
2. Push ups with hand on each balance ball (hard! More stability than reps)
3. Step ups (step up with one leg, raise on heel, driving knee up high using arm swing like you're dashing into a sprint)
4. Good mornings (standing back extension; straight-leg deadlift)
5. Lateral movements (side step across the room and back)
6. Cross-over situps
7. Dive Bombers
8. Squat jumps (jump onto step then jump down)
9. Overhead squat (hold bar overhead while squating)
10. Mountain climbers
11. Lateral movements (again; I was ready to die!!)
12. Leg raises (couldn't do it all the way, so sometimes I just held my legs off the ground).

This was a hard routine but nothing seemed too hard to tweak my back like last time (those one-arm snatches did it for me). I like doing this stuff. It's quick and you definitely feel it. You can really mix it up in a lot of ways. I try to mix up each routine at a different station, but there's nothing stopping me from doing more things around the room (e.g., run around the room) or doing consecutive floor routines (e.g., dive bombers after burpees).

425.5 + 0.5 = 426 miles

PT: 34 miles