Corona hints

#1
Corona Virus - Info from Stanford

Stanford Notes on Coronavirus
The new Coronavirus may not show sign of infection for many days.
How can you know if you are infected? By the time you have fever and/or cough and go to the hospital, the lung is usually 50% fibrosis.

Taiwan experts provide a simple self-check that we can do every morning: Take a deep breath and hold it for more than 10 seconds. If you do this successfully without coughing, without discomfort, stiffness or tightness, there is no fibrosis in the lungs; it basically indicates no infection.

In critical times, please self-check every morning in an environment with clean air. Serious excellent advice by Japanese doctors treating COVID-19 cases: Everyone should ensure your mouth & throat are moist, never dry.

Take a few sips of water every 15 minutes at least. Why? Even if the virus gets into your mouth, drinking water or other liquids will wash them down through your throat and into the stomach.
Once there, your stomach acid will kill all the virus. If you don't drink enough water regularly, the virus can enter your windpipe and then the lungs. That's very dangerous.
Try drinking warm liquid, avoid cold or icy liquid.
Gargle with Listerine or salt water frequently.

Vitamins D3 , B6, C are very helpful with boosting the immune system.

Eat lots of greens and fruits and include lean protein in your diet.
Heat will destroy the virus, so try to cook your food well and avoid raw meats.

Wash your hands frequently, and change your clothes as soon as you go home. Use iron, blow dryer or even dryers to kill the virus on clothes that can not be washed frequently.

Please send and share this with family and friends. Take care everyone and may the world recover from this Coronavirus soon.

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT - CORONAVIRUS:
1. If you have a runny nose and sputum, you have a common cold.

2. Coronavirus pneumonia is a dry cough with no runny nose.

3. This new virus is NOT heat-resistant and will be killed by a temperature of just 26/27 degrees C. (About 77 degrees F.) It hates the Sun.

4. If someone sneezes with it, it goes about 10 feet before it drops to the ground and is no longer airborne.

5. If it drops on a metal surface it will live for at least 12 hours - so if you come into contact with any metal surface, wash your hands as soon as you can with a bacterial soap.

6. On fabric it can survive for 6-12 hours. normal laundry detergent will kill it.

7. Drinking warm water is effective for all viruses. Try not to drink liquids with ice.

8. Wash your hands frequently as the virus can only live on your hands for 5-10 minutes, but - a lot can happen during that time - it would be dangerous if you rub your eyes, pick your nose unwittingly and so on.

9. You should also gargle as a prevention. A simple solution of salt in warm water may suffice.

10. Can't emphasis enough - drink plenty of water!

THE SYMPTOMS:

1. It will first infect the throat, so you'll have a sore throat lasting 3/4 days

2. The virus then blends into a nasal fluid that enters the trachea and then the lungs, causing pneumonia. This takes about 5/6 days further.

3. With the pneumonia comes high fever and difficulty in breathing.

4. The nasal congestion is not like the normal kind. You feel like you're drowning. It's imperative you then seek immediate attention.

5. Stay indoors and keep your distance from others if you can.
 

hlsmith

Less is more. Stay pure. Stay poor.
#2
I've listen to a bunch on this over the past weeks and I found Sam Harris' Podcast #191 to be very informative. Obviously from week to week information is being updated - but the episode is only a couple of days old.
 

ondansetron

TS Contributor
#3
Does anyone have the original post but actually from Stanford? I've seen this a lot and there is a lot of controversy over this supposed "note from a Stanford guy's desk"-- some of it lacks evidence and some of it sounds plain silly. I think if Stanford or some other institution published this, it would be on their main website. I haven't looked though, but don't buy into a lot of the crap online or in the media. The whole "hold your breath for 10 seconds" business is pretty silly, too-- Fibrosis isn't something you'd expect from this corona virus-- fibrosis is usually indicative of long-term damage and inflammation that isn't expected here. The "letter/note" sounds like it's written by someone with a slight medical vocabulary but without understanding of the words.
https://www.independent.co.uk/life-...tips-protection-pandemic-advice-a9399621.html

@gianmarco, @hlsmith, @victorxstc... just tagging you all since you're the only ones I know to have read this.

Obviously, this is just my opinion and not medical advice...for that, speak to your physician.
 
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Karabiner

TS Contributor
#5
OK, so:
Corona Virus - Info from Stanford
Stanford Notes on Coronavirus
This has nothing to do with Stanford University.
By the time you have fever and/or cough and go to the hospital, the lung is usually 50% fibrosis.
Fibrosis is not among the typical symptoms of Corona.
Taiwan experts provide a simple self-check that we can do every morning: Take a deep breath and hold it for more than 10 seconds. If you do this successfully without coughing, without discomfort, stiffness or tightness, there is no fibrosis in the lungs; it basically indicates no infection.
Taiwan experts don't know of such a recommendation.
Take a few sips of water every 15 minutes at least. Why? Even if the virus gets into your mouth, drinking water or other liquids will wash them down through your throat and into the stomach.
The WHO told the world already on February that this is not a measure against Corona infections.

Source: https://correctiv.org/faktencheck/2...wasser-trinken-helfen-nicht-gegen-coronavirus (in German, unfortunately, but the mail exchange with David Heymann, WHO expert, is in English).

I is recommend that we do not spread dubious chain mails, but link to official web sites,
there is plenty of them on the net.

With kind regards

Karabiner
 
#6
Hi guys. Thanks for correcting these sentences. Well I thought they were legit, hence the sharing. It was actually good that I shared them, so that you could debunk those myths.
About fibrosis though, I searched and saw lung fibrosis is a common side effect of corona.
 
#8
Hi guys. Thanks for correcting these sentences. Well I thought they were legit, hence the sharing. It was actually good that I shared them, so that you could debunk those myths.
About fibrosis though, I searched and saw lung fibrosis is a common side effect of corona.
There were some autopsies in China, if I recall, where they saw some fibrosis, but the question is did this exist prior to infection or as a result of huge inflammatory process in the lungs in an intubated ICU patient over weeks. People with underlying lung disease will be more susceptible to a severe case of covid-19 if they contract it (similar to another respiratory infection).

The cough test for fibrosis (and then linking that to covid-19) is kinda hokey, is my point.