How is this relationship between variables called?

#1
Hello!

So, this is the way i see it:

When we have a negative correlation, we have data showing that a low A variable value happens simultaneously with a high B variable value and, in the same set of data, we have data showing that, high A variable value happens simultaneously with a low B variable value.

So, a negative correlation involves data about low A, high B and, at the same time about high A, low B.

But I wonder if there is a name for a relationship between two variables when we only have data showing low A, high B and not also high A, low B?

A variable(3).png

Thank you!
 

Buckeye

Active Member
#2
Definition via google: Negative correlation is a relationship between two variables in which one variable increases as the other decreases, and vice versa. In statistics, a perfect negative correlation is represented by the value -1.0, while a 0 indicates no correlation, and +1.0 indicates a perfect positive correlation.

So, we are speaking about increasing/decreasing as it relates to the trend in the data (the red line in the graph). It might be helpful to think of real-world examples:

As vehicle speed decreases, time to reach destination increases.
When supply decreases, demand increases.
https://examples.yourdictionary.com/negative-correlation-examples.html
 
#3
Definition via google: Negative correlation is a relationship between two variables in which one variable increases as the other decreases, and vice versa. In statistics, a perfect negative correlation is represented by the value -1.0, while a 0 indicates no correlation, and +1.0 indicates a perfect positive correlation.

So, we are speaking about increasing/decreasing as it relates to the trend in the data (the red line in the graph). It might be helpful to think of real-world examples:

As vehicle speed decreases, time to reach destination increases.
When supply decreases, demand increases.
https://examples.yourdictionary.com/negative-correlation-examples.html
I understand. But do we have a name for the type of data relationship present in the upper square?
 

Buckeye

Active Member
#4
The entire picture shows an example of negative correlation. I don't believe we distinguish between the two smaller squares (at least in the context of correlation). Clustering analysis might explain groups of data like that.
 

hlsmith

Less is more. Stay pure. Stay poor.
#5
How do you define low and high - it is all relative. I think you are creating something that doesn't need a name, just talking about the 'tails'.
 
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