Linux

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
Found the error. Not enough virtual memory in root partition. Sorry for the stooopid error.
Oh I've had that too. I think I increased the size of tmpfs in my fstab as a result.

On an unrelated note - I kind of want to give KDE's Plasma 5 a try...
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
I've tried awesome before. I couldn't get into it. In theory I should like tiling window managers but in practice I just never came around to them...
 

vinux

Dark Knight
I am going to change my Hard drive to SSD (Solid state drive). I think this will change dramatic change in the booting time. Have any one experienced the difference?
As expected... it is a big change in booting time. I changed my hard disk to SSD and now the booting time is less than 5 seconds (Including the boot loader). My laptop is more than 4 years old and compatible with Sata 2 only. But still the speed is awesome.

Change to SSD... then with Unity itself you can work faster.
 
The libreoffice is as good as microsoft office?You use in dual boot? Sometimes I think about installing Linux Mint or Manjaro and replace Windows, but do not know if Linux has all the statistical packages that I need.
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
"as good as microsoft office"? Depends on what you're doing. I think it's a great office suite but it isn't a perfect drop in replacement for MS Office. With that said you can install Office via Wine. Which stats packages do you need?

If you're new to linux I would suggest mint over manjaro. Personally I use Arch so you might think that I would suggest Manjaro but I think it's better to get introduced to linux with a more user friendly distro like Mint.
 
"as good as microsoft office"? Depends on what you're doing. I think it's a great office suite but it isn't a perfect drop in replacement for MS Office. With that said you can install Office via Wine. Which stats packages do you need?

If you're new to linux I would suggest mint over manjaro. Personally I use Arch so you might think that I would suggest Manjaro but I think it's better to get introduced to linux with a more user friendly distro like Mint.
I've used Linux for a few months, the advantage I see the Debian-derived distributions (Ubuntu, Mint) is that they have a larger community to support, but I do not like these distro is the fact of having to reinstall the system each new release, in this case distros as Manjaro (derived from Arch) or Sabayon (derived from Gentoo) are better because they are rolling release. Which version of office you can install with wine / PlayOnLinux? You graduated in statistics?
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
I typically use a "lite" version of Linux (xfce desktop), so my computer resources are not taxed all that much. When I really need to use Windows for something, I'll just install virtualbox and create a virtual machine instance of Windows. It's no different than if I had a separate Windows box I'd remote desktop into, except it's all local on my one PC and just as easy to swap files between as if I were moving them across a shared network folder.
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
I typically use a "lite" version of Linux (xfce desktop)
Not so much a lite version of linux as it is a light desktop environment.

When I really need to use Windows for something, I'll just install virtualbox and create a virtual machine instance of Windows.
I wish I could do that but I can't. I don't have any legal Windows install disks and my laptop is kind of crappy and anything that runs in a virtualbox doesn't run well so it wouldn't be worth it.
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
1. Get a new laptop. I just got a bad ass $400 refurb from amazon (private seller: WeeklyCloseouts). Dedicated graphics card, i7 quad core, 4 GB RAM upgradable, small HDD, and I emailed them about the bad battery it had. They shipped me out a replacement without telling me! Bam. Good laptop for gaming and computing!

2. The DE of your distro is pretty much the largest component. If a distro is going to be "lite" it's largely contingent on your DE. The other is what software you install and the DE components required to run them (**** you gnome for bloating me nicely!). Any xfce based distro is going to be "lite" in my book because it's certainly lite-r than the alternative! (unless that alternative is lxde lol)
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
**** that - my laptop runs Arch + xfce great. Xubuntu it lags a bit with. I know it's ****ty and old but it works for me and I don't *need* the extra power so I'm not going to spend money on that right now even if I would *love* to.

Oddly enough though you can say "**** you gnome" but even on my **** laptop I can run gnome really smoothly *if* I'm running Arch. This is because gnome itself isn't too bad - but a lot of distros enable a lot of services that you might not need. If you have a powerful enough computer (and it doesn't really need to be *that* great) these services typically are useful and don't bog you down too much because you have resources to spare. KDE, on the other hand, does bog my computer down. I've tried pretty much all of the desktop environments there are and my favorite two are xfce and gnome. Xfce taking the lead just because it is a bit lighter but I do like some of the additional things that gnome buys me...
 
No doubt virtualbox is great for those who still depend on some application that is only available on Windows. Just to install Linux Manjaro and the version with Xfce is great. R-studio installed without problems.
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
Manjaro is nice. I prefer a pure Arch install although to be honest I do download some of the manjaro themes because they look nice. I forget - what tool does Manjaro use to install from the AUR? I've grown found of cower to facilitate searching and downloading the .tar.gz files but do the building myself. I use to use yaourt with no GUI but had some issues with it in the past and found cower instead.
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
I still haven't drank the Arch Kool-Aid yet. I have an Arch VM at work for exploring server technologies (MongoDB at the moment, really, but I could try R server or Tableau server on it if I could). My Pi runs Arch, which I still need to finish setting up my remote administration on it so I can set it up. I want to use it for a VPN most of all. That way I can use my laptop on any WiFi and feel a little more secure routing securely through my home network. I don't want to muck up the security stuff (certificates), so I need time to sit down and go through it on rigorously, document it, and test it. My time is not that available these days! For any regular use as a desktop, I'm still digging Debian-based distros, and Mint has been the best so far when it comes to compatibility (getting the laptop up was a pain! **** NVidia driver defaulted to one that didn't work when there was the right one listed as recommended!! wtf).
 
Manjaro is nice. I prefer a pure Arch install although to be honest I do download some of the manjaro themes because they look nice. I forget - what tool does Manjaro use to install from the AUR? I've grown found of cower to facilitate searching and downloading the .tar.gz files but do the building myself. I use to use yaourt with no GUI but had some issues with it in the past and found cower instead.
I avoid downloading AUR packages because this is a community repository, but the tools I know to use this are "yaourt" and the "packer", but for all I know the two are very similar, the two are automated for installing packages .
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
I've used both and they are very similar. While I understand the desire to avoid the AUR I'd say that the AUR is one of things that makes Arch so great - plus you can easily check the pkgbuild and see exactly what it is doing. The base repos have a lot of good stuff but there is a lot of stuff that will never make it into them.
 
I've used both and they are very similar. While I understand the desire to avoid the AUR I'd say that the AUR is one of things that makes Arch so great - plus you can easily check the pkgbuild and see exactly what it is doing. The base repos have a lot of good stuff but there is a lot of stuff that will never make it into them.
Let's say I have data in a .ods document libreoffice, I can import this data to the R? How to make it?