Linux

TheEcologist

Global Moderator
#81
You could also use Dolphin or some other file manager. But in general just go to your favorite terminal emulator and type "cd path/to/music" (cd = change directory) and then use "ls" (ls = list contents).
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
#83
I used Fedora years ago. I'm sure it is a lot different now! I always like Suse, but I'm sure it's different, too. I've been enjoying Xubuntu these days. It's common place that I have completely forgotten about Windows!
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#84
I've used Fedora. I didn't mind it and it worked good enough for me. A distro is a distro though and I preferred .deb to .rpm and apt-get to yum so I switched back to Ubuntu.

Edit: Which reminds me once I get done with a certain project (which should be over by mid January) I want to convert my linux box to Arch and actually take the time to install all the tools I need.
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#88
Gentoo is a little more hardcore. There is a nice package manager for arch and there is the Arch Users Repository (AUR - at least thats what I think AUR stands for) which packages a lot of things up that aren't in the base repos.

When you install arch you're left with just the command line and the base tools (you don't even get Xorg by default). But you don't need to compile the kernel or compile everything from source if you don't want to. It's lightweight and a pretty fun distro to use in general.
 

TheEcologist

Global Moderator
#89
You know, Gnome 3 is far too focused on mouse movement, making to many mouse miles and I don't like touching filthy rodents. So I think I am going to distro hop again.. any suggestions?

BTW, why don't you start an Arch installation club Dason. I will certainly join in the fun!
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#90
If you don't like using the mouse you could try a tiling window manager like xmonad or i3. They take a little while to get used to but are actually pretty nice.

There isn't a need to switch distros - just change up your desktop environment or window manager.
 

TheEcologist

Global Moderator
#91
There isn't a need to switch distros - just change up your desktop environment or window manager.
That is not entirely true the support for the non-standard desktop environments is often low to lacking depending on the distro of course.

xmonad is only nice with a huge screen, which is actually a cool excuse to go on and buy a big old 22' .... Never heard of i3. How is your experience with that?
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#92
I wouldn't say that xmonad is only nice with a huge screen. The defaults aren't that great for smaller screens but it's highly customizable and you can do some pretty awesome stuff with it. But then again you need to know a little bit of haskell to customize it. But it's not too bad to pick up.

I think i3 is alright. I think I actually preferred wmii but I remember having some problems with wmii at one point. But that might have been on arch and I might not have got it installed right.
 

bugman

Super Moderator
#93
I take possession of a new desktop on Friday. 8GB HD and 12GB RAM.

I am still using Ubuntu 11.10 (only 2D version) - should I stick with Ubuntu or is there a better distro for personal desktops? Considering Linux Mint, but I think open suse just released a new version.

I need something in the beginner /intermedite capability range. Arch is not an option for me.It looks like a nightmare to install!!



EDIT: 12G RAM; i7 processor; HD -unknown
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#94
Arch really isn't that bad to install mainly for one reason: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Beginners'_Guide

The Arch community is really great and I know I learned quite a bit about Linux going through the installation. With that said I don't have Arch on any of my main systems right now.

What do you plan on doing with the computer? Is there a reason you plan on using "only 2D version"? And I'm guessing with 12GB of RAM that the HD is actually larger than 8GB?
 

bugman

Super Moderator
#95
Hey Dason, thanks for the arch link. Soundsl like a project for a rainy weekend.As for the specs, I think the selllermust have written them down wrong. I haven't seen it, but Im getting it very very cheaply because the owner has gone ipad, i everything.

I am running 2D becasue my old but not crappy laptop hasn't got the graphics card to run it properly!

With the new one I manily want to use it for my photography, but with that much RAM I guess the world is my oyster.
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#96
Ah! Sorry - I read that as "I am planning on using Ubuntu 11.10 (only 2D version)" for some reason.

It wouldn't hurt to try something else out. Ubuntu is by far the easiest to install and use. Fedora is a close second though! Either way I would suggest giving Gnome-Shell a try as I much prefer it to Unity (although Unity was ok I guess). With that said on my Linux laptop at the moment I'm running Ubuntu 10.04. The power regression was killing my battery life and I missed Gnome2 so downgrading to the Long Term Service release made sense to me. I guess I'll see what 12.04 is like when it comes out but I like 10.04.
 

bugman

Super Moderator
#97
Great tips. Cheers Dason. I think I'll start with Mint, then Fedora.Arch will need more research.

Its not boring with linux.
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
#98
The thing I like about xubuntu is I get all the great Ubuntu strength in an OS but a lightweight footprint. Now, that's good since I'm low on resources, but I'd probably still have a pretty slim system even if I had a ton of resources! I could commit more of it to things like processing power and games :D

If I were to play with another system, I'd probably go with Gentoo, but I guess Arch would make just as fun a project.
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
Well I've never used it, so I don't know how much I would like it, but Gentoo is designed to be compiled from scratch. You build everything. Thus, it is optimized for the system on which you built it. It also uses the Portage package management system, which is supposed to be really good. Though, to be honest, I've learned to love the Debian based one. But like I alluded to, Arch has a similar philosophy on building up your own system, and I've heard good things about it.

I run Xubuntu at home. I started off with Ubuntu 2D because my system is old (single core, oh noes!!). Turned out I was perfectly comfortable with the xubuntu desktop, so I converted over to that and have been happy since. It's breathed a couple more years of life into my computer, which is good since I can't afford anything new until I get a new job.