Linux

TheEcologist

Global Moderator
Oh I was always running PCLINUXOS (very small but very friendly community), and most prominently I had microphone issues. Also, connecting to projector did not always work... this issues are now solved. There are some minor irritations in fedora concerning mp3 and .avi files (wont run directly and repository doesn't ship standard with the required libraries) .. but these issues are minor. Also I really like the 64 bit support, which was still in testing for PCLINUXOS.
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
Yeah Fedora is pretty strict on the free software side of things. RPM Fusion fixes some of those issues though. I've tried Fedora a few times and some of the things that were really easy in Ubuntu or Mint were a pain in Fedora. I also didn't like yum too much so I never stuck with Fedora.

I do like Gnome Shell though - but it seems to give me some issues so I haven't been using that.
 

vinux

Dark Knight
More than 50 % of active linux distros and user base using debian.I would love to see a common packaging for all distros( never happen, packaging as part of religious culture).

Redhat was my favourite distro before ubuntu. I guess you are on the track of ubuntu or mint in future( unity united to move few ubuntu users to move to mint). TE is going to hate me in the technical discussion. Apart from Linux rivalry, now I become a huge fan of ggplot2 and full time emacs user.
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
I like Ubuntu, but even though my computer is pretty solid (hardware-wise), I like lightweight distros. I'm running the Xubuntu desktop, and it is great because it runs entirely in memory. My aim is to switch over to a straight 64 bit Debian system with Xfce desktop. However, I am seeing some great reviews of mint, and unlike Ubuntu, Mint doesn't seem to weight down Xfce--i.e., in Xubuntu, you're still required to install and run a suite of gnome components that work on things like the Software Center, giving Xubuntu some pretty large requirements, defeating the purpose of a lightweight system! I'm also tempted to go the Lxde route, as it is truly lightweight, but it doesn't seem nearly as developed as Xfce is. Maybe it'll be better in the future, especially for low resource computers, but Debian+Xfce or Mint+Xfce will probably be perfect for me. I love the Debian package manager, and the components are pretty common among Ubuntu, Debian, and Mint, from what I've seen, so it shouldn't be any real problem for me to get my system up to speed on any of these distros. I think R and Quantum-GIS are the only 2 repos I have set up externally from Ubuntu. Anyway, I'd love to become a full time emacs user (though, maybe outside of R--RStudio is an awesome IDE), and I think ggplot2 is developing to be a pretty amazing graphics package that it should be respected. With that said, I still think people should come from a background of understanding base graphics in R, but I digress.
 

TheEcologist

Global Moderator
More than 50 % of active linux distros and user base using debian.I would love to see a common packaging for all distros( never happen, packaging as part of religious culture).

Redhat was my favourite distro before ubuntu. I guess you are on the track of ubuntu or mint in future( unity united to move few ubuntu users to move to mint). TE is going to hate me in the technical discussion. Apart from Linux rivalry, now I become a huge fan of ggplot2 and full time emacs user.

Your use of emacs has nullified your vile comment concerning ggplot2, hence you are neutral in my book.
 

vinux

Dark Knight
I am looking for a best linux distribution for my netbook. Ubuntu is ok. but still looking for better one for my small machine. I can't install arch because I can't make the primary partition( The stupid windows occupies the 3 primary partition; to avoid and argument with my wife I am not touching those.)
I will try tinyCore tomorrow. I installed puppy linux today. It is nice. I experimented using the USB. But didn't feel to install in the internal hard drive. I found some satisfaction in bodhi linux.(one of Dason's distro ). e17 is nice. Some graphics effects and menu structure is disturbing. But I guess i can customize those. Also downloaded slux and pinguy.
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
I like tinyCore. It loads up so freakin' fast, it's amazing. Mainly because it doesn't come with anything! I couldn't do much with it because it doesn't really come ready for wireless. My oooold thinkpad has no ethernet port or adapter, one USB port, and a cdrom. Since I didn't feel like burning another CD and trying to figure out what extra stuff to put on it, I haven't touched it since. For old equipment, you can really do well with tinyCore. It's like Arch in that you have to set everything up. Unlike Arch, I don't think it comes with a well developed system for doing that! tinyCore is not for noobs by any means.
 

TheEcologist

Global Moderator
I like tinyCore. It loads up so freakin' fast, it's amazing. Mainly because it doesn't come with anything! I couldn't do much with it because it doesn't really come ready for wireless. My oooold thinkpad has no ethernet port or adapter, one USB port, and a cdrom. Since I didn't feel like burning another CD and trying to figure out what extra stuff to put on it, I haven't touched it since. For old equipment, you can really do well with tinyCore. It's like Arch in that you have to set everything up. Unlike Arch, I don't think it comes with a well developed system for doing that! tinyCore is not for noobs by any means.

Thanks, thats all I need to know :)
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
But if I were TE, I wouldn't give my address to a t-1000 :D
I am not a T-1000. I am 100% human. Here - have a look at my /proc/cpuinfo file. This should prove once and for all that I'm human.

Code:
dasonk@Ames ~ $ cat /proc/cpuinfo 
processor	: 0
vendor_id	: GenuineHumanBrain
cpu family	: 6
model		: 15
model name	: Dason(R) Core(TM)2 Brain         HUMAN  @ 8.66GHz
I cut off the rest of the output since it wasn't as relevant.
 

bugman

Super Moderator
LINUX MINT 13 [MATE] - I was ripping my hair out yesturday because I just couldn't figure out how to change the colour of my window borders. Obviously I was changing themes etc.. but apparently it is a compatibility issue with compiz and mate Anyway, the reason for posting is to share the solution if any other MATE users are having simialr issues: Install "ubuntu tweak" - go to the tweaks tab and change your theme from there. Instant success. "Gnome tweak tool" didn't work. Now my desktop looks like a million bucks (oh, expect it was free!).
 

TheEcologist

Global Moderator
LINUX MINT 13 [MATE] - I was ripping my hair out yesturday because I just couldn't figure out how to change the colour of my window borders. Obviously I was changing themes etc.. but apparently it is a compatibility issue with compiz and mate Anyway, the reason for posting is to share the solution if any other MATE users are having simialr issues: Install "ubuntu tweak" - go to the tweaks tab and change your theme from there. Instant success. "Gnome tweak tool" didn't work. Now my desktop looks like a million bucks (oh, expect it was free!).
We demand screenshots!
 

TheEcologist

Global Moderator
Many people have urged me to try Rstudio, which is indeed nice, but has a single focus; R - and too many features I don't need. I also tried Eclipse statet, but I find it has the same problem.. limited scope.. and to much I don't need.

Plus I don't only use R, I also use C, PhP or SQL and I want the same editor for all of these. I also want an editor that I can customize without headaches for everything, and there really is just one for me - gEdit.

On a glance it may seem very limited but that is just not the case... it's power is that it is easily customizable and thus potentially very powerful.
So as a guide for people who want to try gEdit's power.. here is a short guide to go from gEdit to gEdit ++ to eventually gEdit ++ super IDE;

1) get the full suite of plugins - this usually means you need to do this; sudo apt-get install gedit-plugins

2) Install the most useful ones,

  • External Tools (run shell commands or pipe code in gEdit)
  • Snippets (for quick code snippets)
  • Embedded Terminal (complete with pipe to terminal command)
  • Multi Edit (or imitation)
  • Bracket Completion: To automatically complete ending bracket (although I prefer Bracket highlighting)

3) install some to your own interest


Now I have only listed a few, there are many many more (like projects and session managers, file browsers, file path pullers), and if you miss some special feature you can add it yourself.. very very easily - and that my friends is where the real power of gEdit lies - infinite customizability

So if you're ready to jump to another editor again, why not try gEdit, its as small and simple as you want it or as bloated with functionality as you wish. Which is exactly why I love it.. as you wish.. freedom with nothing predefined! So experience freedom from all the wrapped-up and predefined - we are all different with each of us a unique set of needs ;)

Freeing your code on step at a time,

TE