Parasites in stats

#1
Hi everyone,
I am having a bit of trouble in understand the stats that I want to run on an experiment I am doing. Basically I want to do a Chi square test but I have a low sample size, still I thought I would check to see what I get.
My research is a drug trial looking at reducing the number of parasites in mice (numbered 1-5 below), basically the drug has shown an in vitro reduction in parasites and now I have tried it in vivo. male and female parasites were covered after the experiment. the lower the number of males and females the better the drug is working.

No treatment (control)
1- males (7) females (7)
2- males (10) females (10)
3- males (10) females (7)
4- males (10) females (10)
5- males (11) females (11)

Drug treatment.
1- males (4) females (4)
2- males (7) females (7)
3- males (12) females (12)
4- males (5) females (5)
5- males (5) females (5)

I know that there are calculators that can help me do this on the internet but I am having trouble with them-
If any one could have a look at this data and help it would be very appreciated!
thanks!
B
 
#3
Hi,
The 1-5 are the mice that I used numbered, with two sets of 1-5 representing my treatment and control groups with even numbers. The numbers next to these (the one following the male or female) are total number of parasites retrieved.
Does that make sense? So basically I had 10 mice infected with a parasite, and divided them into two groups and gave one group a drug to see if it killed the parasites. After a few weeks I then counted the total number of adult parasites within the mice and those numbers were recorded for each mouse.
thanks!
B
 

bugman

Super Moderator
#4
Bonnie, unless you have reason to keep the mice separate, I would pool them into two categories: "sex" and "treatment" this will remove issues of small sample sizes for each group and then perform a two way contingency table with these data.

However, if you are using mice from the same lineage you might have issues of non-independence (i.e. brothers and sisters might be more resistant because of their genetics or whatever).

P