Power and Alpha combinations for same sample size

#1
Let's say I have a sample size established with alpha=0.05 and power=0.8 (based on time constraint for study).

So, the same sample size can be achieved with any of:

alpha = 0.001 and power = 0.31
alpha = 0.01 and power = 0.58
alpha = 0.25 and power = 0.95
alpha = 0.999 and power = 0.998

I want to know is what levels of risk to expect from the study of this size: what alpha I can aim for and what power I can hope to achieve.

Which combination of alpha and power do I adopt? Why?
 
Last edited:

CowboyBear

Super Moderator
#3
I want to know is what levels of risk to expect from the study of this size: what alpha I can aim for and what power I can hope to achieve.
In reality, most people set alpha of 0.05, because that's what most people set (i.e., it's tradition). This usually implies that alpha is smaller than 1-power. Possibly this would be justified if we felt that the consequences of a type 1 error were much more disastrous than those of a type 2 error. But obviously it's ridiculous to claim that this holds true in all of science, and that in all of science the relative costs of type 1 and type 2 errors are so similar that alpha = 0.05 is always the right choice. So again, it's just tradition.

A commenter on your post on stackexchange brings up the idea of conceptualising significance testing as a ROC analysis. And that can be helpful: We could try and select an alpha that is "optimal" in some specific sense (e.g., being most likely to result in the correct decision). However, methods for selecting an optimal cutoff in ROC analysis pretty much always take into account the prior probability that the case is a "disease" (i.e. that the null hypothesis is false). And no one ever really approaches significance testing in this way; people generally aren't willing to specify a prior probability that the null hypothesis is false. Unless they're Bayesians, in which case they wouldn't be using this framework in the first place.

tl;dr there is no sensible answer to this question. Abandon significance testing, all ye who enter here.