Testing changes over years

#1
Hi, I have a set of data of carbon levels for 4 different sectors from 2005-2017 with one overall total measurement for each year for each sector (e.g agriculture - 2005 - 34.1;transport-2005-1069.2; Domestic - 2014 - 2074.2). I'm wanting to compare each sector to see which was more successful and if there's any correlations between the changes over the years between the sectors.

Is this possible? What would my data classify as? Which tests should I use?
 

Karabiner

TS Contributor
#3
I'm wanting to compare each sector to see which was more successful
What do you mean by successful?

and if there's any correlations between the changes over the years between the sectors.
Do you mean absolute changes or relative changes? Do you mean changes from year to year or changes relative to baseline? For example, if relative to baseline you could set the initial value to an index=100 and the other values relative to that index, and then correlate.

With kind regards

Karabiner
 
#4
What do you mean by successful?


Do you mean absolute changes or relative changes? Do you mean changes from year to year or changes relative to baseline? For example, if relative to baseline you could set the initial value to an index=100 and the other values relative to that index, and then correlate.

With kind regards

Karabiner
I guess I mean which had the more substantial change and it would be absolute change I believe
 

Karabiner

TS Contributor
#5
Sorry, but if you don‘t know what you want to find out, how should someone
be able to suggest the appropriate analysis? Either this is a homework task,
then please post the complete question here, or it is your own research, then
please spent some time contemplating your research question first.

With kind regards

Karabiner
 
#6
Sorry, but if you don‘t know what you want to find out, how should someone
be able to suggest the appropriate analysis? Either this is a homework task,
then please post the complete question here, or it is your own research, then
please spent some time contemplating your research question first.

With kind regards

Karabiner
My research is an analysis on a councils success in reducing their carbon emissions for different sectors: the industry, domestic, transport and agriculture sectors.
I'm wanting to find out which of the sectors they've been most successful in reducing their carbon emissions for. Looking at the data and graphs I have it's obvious, however my dissertation requires a statistical analysis so I was wondering if there was one to be able to support this.
 
#7
My research is an analysis on a councils success in reducing their carbon emissions for different sectors: the industry, domestic, transport and agriculture sectors.
I'm wanting to find out which of the sectors they've been most successful in reducing their carbon emissions for. Looking at the data and graphs I have it's obvious, however my dissertation requires a statistical analysis so I was wondering if there was one to be able to support this.
Again by successful I mean the most substantial reduction over time

If this is still to broad then thank you for any help anyways
 

Karabiner

TS Contributor
#8
This is not too broad, in my opinion, it is just meaningless. Throwing in words without an attempt to clarify and to define them is not science. This is far more important than the statistical tests and p-value stuff we discuss here.
One question would be: Does reduction refer here to % decrease or to absolute decrease? Or to both? If baseline emission is 100‘000 in one sector and 100 in the other, then 1% decrease in the first and 90% decrease in the latter means 1000 vs 90 in absolute terms. If have no idea which one of these concepts of reduction (there might be still other ones) you have in mind. I also don‘t know whether it is crucial to take into account that emissions have been measured over 13 years, or whether it is just the comparison between baseline and year 2012 which matters. In addition, I don’t know what you mean by substantial, which degree/amounts of reduction you’d consider non-substantial.

Or maybe you just try stasis‘ suggestion.

With kind regards

Karabiner
 
#9
This is not too broad, it is just meaningless. Throwing in words without an attempt to clarify and to define them is not science. One question would be: Does reduction refer here to % decrease or to absolute decrease? Or to both? If baseline emission is 100‘000 in one sector and 100 in the other, then 1% decrease in the first and 90% decrease in the latter means 1000 vs 90 in absolute terms. If have no idea which one of these concepts of reduction (there might be still other ones) you have in mind. I also don‘t know whether it is crucial to take into account that emissions have been measured over 13 years, or whether it is just the comparison between baseline and year 2012 which matters. In addition, I don’t know what you mean by substantial, which degree/amounts of reduction you’d consider non-substantial.

Or maybe you just try stasis‘ suggestion.

With kind regards

Karabiner
I see, thank you that actually helps a lot in answering my question! I can't seem to grasp stats so that helps me a lot in figuring out specifically what I was asking as I wasn't sure which questions about my data to be asking in the first place.

Apologies for not being able to expand too much, I will be taking what you have said on board and will hopefully get a better idea of where to go from there.

Appreciate the help.