The Talk Stats Video Club

SiBorg

New Member
#1
After reading about the book club, I thought that a video club might be equally interesting.

I found these two videos very good and well worth a watch:

[youtube]kLmzxmRcUTo[/youtube]

[youtube]xGXt3GUJ-9w[/youtube]

There are quite a few other interesting-looking videos on that site too.

Has anyone else got any videos to share?
 
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bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
#3
I like this idea. I'll try to remember to participate if I come across good videos when I'm bored at work lol

I watched a lot of TED talks. I like that Donnelly one. Good intuitive approach to talking about probability that people generally don't get, even students of probability!
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
#7
I love the RSA videos. I know I posted the link here (chatbox) and on facebook. I guess it could be appropriate to leave here. This one is from Sir Ken Robinson on changing how we view our educational paradigms. In particular, we need to consider that the way we have to learn today is different than how our educational system was initially designed around industry (set times, bells to signal change of tasks, learning in a set time frame within a set class of students, with set standards for what is appropriate). I think a lot of the ideas can mesh with the above video.

[youtube]zDZFcDGpL4U[/youtube]
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
#8
This one I found in the related links to Sir Ken Robinson's TED talk (the 2006 one, I believe, which I recommend both! They're great). Just watching this video makes me want to go be a math teacher! lol

[youtube]BlvKWEvKSi8[/youtube]
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
#9
I'm loving this guy's lectures. I'm still blown away that it's a political science class, because my friend's experience in masters of political science (international relations) was that the quantitative stuff was a joke. This guy's teaching me stats better than my econometric classes! lol Each of his lectures for this class are long, but he covers a lot of advanced details I never saw in my introductory classes. Very good explication. I especially like the geometric interpretation in his first lecture (Lecture "3" for week 3). The lecture below is covering some specific hypothesis testing stuff, and he begins with some nice examples of size vs power. The R examples help.

[youtube]b9K5wSp_bSY[/youtube]
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
#10
[youtube]BwTMzYo84Ao[/youtube]

Well, if you ever wanted to play around with Lisp, you need only start up Emacs! It actually makes a lot of sense, if you've ever at least looked at a Lisp interpreter. ****, Emacs is amazing!
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#11
I thought everybody knew that emacs had a lisp interpreter built in! You silly non-emacs users have a lot to learn...
 

vinux

Dark Knight
#12
I thought everybody knew that emacs had a lisp interpreter built in! You silly non-emacs users have a lot to learn...
I guess everybody know the lisp interpreter part. For me the first part was learning the sloccount. I never knew something like this existed.
 
#14
Thanks to everyone for making this thread so interesting. Can anyone let me know how to embed the video in the post rather than just the link as they look far more appealing that way! My first post looks a bit drab compared to the rest....!
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#15
The last youtube video posted used this for their code:

[noparse]
[youtube]U6FvJ6jMGHU[/youtube]
[/noparse]

So basically you grab the id from the youtube url and put it inside the youtube tags.
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#20
And if that's the one you were referring to just know that Dirk and Romain have worked on Rcpp A LOT and it's ridiculously easily to get started with this stuff now.