University Survey on Parallel Computing in Statistics

#1
Dear colleagues,

I hope that the initiative below is appropriate and of interest to be posted through the Talk Stats forum.

The Centre for Health Informatics at University of Manchester is conducting a review on parallel computing in statistics. This study is being conducted within the University of Manchester and open to other institutions/research centres in UK and worldwide.
We hope that this survey gives indications on how parallel statistical computing should evolve in terms of software/resources, and also to have a clear picture of the current literacy among the people working in statistics.

If you are a statistician or if you are involved in theoretical/applied statistics in general, we hope that you may be interested in helping us by completing an on-line survey, which should take about five minutes (and no more than ten). There will be also a prize draw.

The link to the survey will show a disclaimer on the first page with additional details.

Link to the survey:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1NNPuCxDR_QCMAiTe0MbA9zJjJk_m-YNq6ew6tkibato/viewform

We thank you for your valuable time.
Best regards,


Mattia Prosperi.

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Centre for Health Informatics (CHI)
Institute of Population Health
University of Manchester
University Place, Oxford Road
Manchester M13 9PL, United Kingdom
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spunky

Can't make spagetti
#2
this survey made me feel bad...

... of how much we need these resources at my uni and how little access we have to them :(
 

hlsmith

Less is more. Stay pure. Stay poor.
#3
If you are going to open this up to many research individuals, you should have an open-ended comments item at the end. This way we can list off limitations of survey or ways to improve it for subsequent iterations or publications. I love reading other peoples instruments and thinking about the potentially generated data. You should also say, hey how did you hear about this survey, so you can target those areas or target the areas with sparse responses.