Null Hypothesis

#1
One of the biggest issues facing e-retailers is the ability to turn browsers into buyers. This is measured by the conversion rate, the percentage of browsers who buy something in their visit to a site. The conversion rate for a company's website was 10.1%. The website at the company was redesigned to increase its conversion rates. A sample of 200 browsers at the redesigned site was selected. Suppose that 24 browsers made a purchase. The company officials would like to know if there is evidence of an increase in conversion rate at the 5% level of significance.

Referring to the above, the largest level of significance at which the null hypothesis will not be rejected is
A. 0.186
B. 0.153
C. 0.162
D. 0.166
 

AngleWyrm

Active Member
#2
The measurement of past performance was 10.1% of browsers bought something.
So if used as a prediction of the future, 200 x 10.1% = 20 buyers out of the sample represents no change
But we have 24 browsers that bought something, a small increase.

A good question to ask at this point is: What is the significance level of this increase?
 
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katxt

Well-Known Member
#5
Why do some lecturers get bored with questions that they find too easy, but students find too hard, and so entertain themselves with tricky questions that they think are cute but are just silly and frustrate their students?
 

AngleWyrm

Active Member
#6
Choose one of the answers from the set of options presented in the original post, by any process that yields a correct answer with odds better than random chance.

Since 'ask someone else to do it' is a valid process: There's lots of pages on the internet describing how to arrive at the correct answer
 
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noetsi

No cake for spunky
#7
Why do some lecturers get bored with questions that they find too easy, but students find too hard, and so entertain themselves with tricky questions that they think are cute but are just silly and frustrate their students?
Because they know their field very well and understood the questions very well even when they were students. It is hard for them to understand the material is hard for those who are not so gifted.

Also because they don't want students just memorizing answers without having a clue what they mean in practice which many students do.
 

katxt

Well-Known Member
#8
You're right, of course, noetsi. The classic curse of knowledge. Alas, some lecturers, although they may be super smart at stats, they are not smart enough to think of simple things that can help students learn.