Ubuntu

Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu

    Votes: 1 50.0%
  • Other. Please explain

    Votes: 1 50.0%

  • Total voters
    2
  • Poll closed .

bugman

Super Moderator
#1
:mad: I'm done with windows. I 'm serving it with divorce papers. We are through.

Is there any reason I should not convert to Ubuntu? Will my word documents open in Ubuntu for instance?

Since I have little to no experience with other systems, do people think this is a good option? Or should I look else where?
 
Last edited:

TheEcologist

Global Moderator
#2
Hi Bugman,

I wont vote for Ubuntu, but I will also not start a holy war for my prefered distro (pclinuxos). My advice to you would be to get a stable Linux distro, one that is easy on beginners (Ubuntu is fine, PCLOS is also very suitable for beginners). If you come directly from windows a gentle transition desktop environment would be KDE, so if you go for PCLOS get it with KDE, or if you go for Ubuntu get Kubuntu [I use PCLOS-Gnome right now].

Why I use PCLOS:

It very stable, nothing is added unless it passes vigorous testing by Texstar (PCLOS creator) and his team.
Its a rolling release (look it up)
the help community on their forum is great
40 000 + programs can be installed directly through the repositories (Ubuntu as this as well though)

Concerning you question: In short I can tell you that all your word documents will open in Ubuntu, only problem is that they will look wierd your graphics won't showup, equations will be wrong, layout will randomly change. This has nothing to do with Ubuntu, and allot more to do with MS not providing comparability for opensource.

The perfect way around this: get oracle virtual box. You then run windows in a virtual PC, and have all the benefits of Linux while keeping full compatibility for your work or with your peers. I run my virtual machine in seamless mode or on an external monitor.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i83cmuNAKNA

Preview of the look and feel op kubutu
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LdIEeJ9PnGc
 

vinux

Dark Knight
#3
My suggestion is Ubuntu/Linux Mint(modified ubuntu). If you don't have linux experience, you need some time to really appreciate linux ( expectation set by Windows) os.


You could install Ubuntu 11.04. ( 10.04 is the long term support version ) or Linux Mint 10.

The following link give lot of information about linux distribution.
http://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=major
 

bugman

Super Moderator
#4
The Ecologist,

thankyou for taking time to respond. This advice is valuable.

It certainly isn't my intention to start a war, as I am genuinely looking for advice on which os to use.
I have taken your comments on board and will look further into this.

P
 

vinux

Dark Knight
#5
This is not a war :). I and Ecologist had this difference when I joined this forum. But the difference in the distro choice made lot of learning for me. For an experienced user, any linux distribution is fine, he could tweak any distribution into optimized level(matter of time).
 

TheEcologist

Global Moderator
#7
Hi Bugman,

I know you didn't intend to start a war, its just that questions like 'what is the best distro' often lead up to heated debates in Linux land. Don't worry just view your distro choice as a beverage choice.. what flavor would you like? Like beverages they are all mostly the same, they just have different flavors.. however some are acquired tastes (life coffee) and others [Slackware] may not be suited for beginners (like beverages with alcohol are not suited for children).

Choose a flavor you like, and know it will be just as easy to choose a new flavor if the other one is boring you. Why dont you try this guide:
http://www.labnol.org/software/best-linux-distros/12757/
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#10
Also - it's not a bad idea to play around with different desktop environments when you first start to see which you like the most. TheEcologist mentioned KDE which is a pretty popular one - but I really don't like it. I don't know why. It's nice but I've just never really liked it. If you decide to go with Ubuntu note that 11.04 started using Unity as the default DE for Ubuntu and it's quite different. It's interesting but I don't really like it all that much. But give a couple different ones a try.
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#12
I tried it a little while ago but I don't think it got setup correctly. It looked nice and I've heard good things but I don't feel like I should comment since I think I was working with a broken build.
 

Link

Ninja say what!?!
#13
Hi,

I recently (about a year ago) got into Linux. I decided on Ubuntu because it was so user friendly. In addition, I didn't want to completely abandon Windows so I set up a dual boot. Here are me thoughts:

- You'll have to take some time to do the research and become familiar with Ubuntu. There are quite a few things that work differently.

- Be ready if some of the things don't work in Ubuntu. I find it frustrating that
i) I can't suspend my laptop in Ubuntu. I've figured out that it's cause of this one file. If I delete it though, something bad happens.
ii) Office 2007 doesn't work nearly as good in Linux as it does in Windows. Yeah, you can get it to work with Wine, but even then...there are features, shortcuts, and commands that just work better in Windows.
iii) be ready to trouble shoot issues too if you dual boot. One I'm working with right now that's frustrating is that files I create in Linux won't read on Windows...very weird...trying to figure out the issue right now.

- One of the cool things about Ubuntu is the ability to customize. However, this WILL take research and work to figure it out. You'll want to become familiar with the Synaptic Package Manager.

- One of the best features I like so far about Ubuntu is the ability to save whatever windows are currently open when you shut down. When you turn you comp back on, those windows reappear. The multiple work spaces is nice too, but you can get that for windows too.

- With all the programming I now do in R, you would figure that I would prefer Linux....and I do when I'm using the "multicore" package. However, I still like npp better than gedit. The integrated features just executes better. Take for example the smart highlighting feature...I managed to get it working on gedit, but it lags badly when I highly multiple lines.
 
Last edited:

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#14
i) I can't suspend my laptop in Ubuntu. I've figured out that it's cause of this one file. If I delete it though, something bad happens.
Interesting. I can suspend just fine.
iii) be ready to trouble shoot issues too if you dual boot. One I'm working with right now that's frustrating is that files I create in Linux won't read on Windows...very weird...trying to figure out the issue right now.
Sounds like an encoding issue. Is it that files you make on the Linux side you can't access when boot into Windows? Or is it that files you create on the Linux boot can't be read by ANY windows machine?
- One of the cool things about Ubuntu is the ability to customize. However, this WILL take research and work to figure it out. You'll want to become familiar with the Symantec Package Manager.
Note that this is true of any linux distro.

- With all the programming I now do in R, you would figure that I would prefer Linux....and I do when I'm using the "multicore" package. However, I still like npp better than gedit. The integrated features just executes better. Take for example the smart highlighting feature...I managed to get it working on gedit, but it lags badly when I highly multiple lines.
Which reminds me - I've been meaning to try gedit out again with some of those plugins for R. I mainly use Emacs+ESS or R Studio but I like to try new things and it's been a while since I tried gedit...
 

Link

Ninja say what!?!
#15
Interesting. I can suspend just fine.
Yeah...I think it's unique to HP Envy's. I looked it up a while back and there was no solution to it other than deleting the file. Deleting it DID work, but it messed something up...forgot what it was that messed up though.

Sounds like an encoding issue. Is it that files you make on the Linux side you can't access when boot into Windows? Or is it that files you create on the Linux boot can't be read by ANY windows machine?
Thanks for the advice. If I copy the files onto a flash drive (from Linux), I can read it from any Windows machine. When I boot into Windows though, the files show up on the HD but won't open. It just says something along the lines of "file doesn't exist" even though it's showing in the directory! I think it has something to do with the updates since this started happening after updating Ubuntu.

Which reminds me - I've been meaning to try gedit out again with some of those plugins for R. I mainly use Emacs+ESS or R Studio but I like to try new things and it's been a while since I tried gedit...
I like R-studio. For some reason, I just prefer having separate windows for my R console and my editor though. Tried to get Notepad++ working with Linux but it'll only work through Wine and still has bugs.
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#16
Thanks for the advice. If I copy the files onto a flash drive (from Linux), I can read it from any Windows machine. When I boot into Windows though, the files show up on the HD but won't open. It just says something along the lines of "file doesn't exist" even though it's showing in the directory! I think it has something to do with the updates since this started happening after updating Ubuntu.
I don't know how to fix that problem. I don't have a dual boot at the moment but I use Dropbox and that's a pretty nice way to share files across different computers. It could work by having dropbox installed on both boots but then of course you have the same files on your machine twice...
 

Link

Ninja say what!?!
#17
Hehehe....actually, I sort of cheated the Dropbox system by installing it on both OS's...but creating different accounts and setting them in different folders. Allows me more free space.
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#18
Then I guess if there are only a few files you want access to on both machines you could create a shared folder and allow Dropbox to do the syncing for you.

Quick question though - can you access the window's files from the ubuntu side?
 

Link

Ninja say what!?!
#19
Quick question though - can you access the window's files from the ubuntu side?
Yes.

PS. I've started troubleshooting again and see that I can read files created in Linux now. I just need to check to see if files created by R in Linux are readable now.